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Date: 11 November 2018
Time: 7.30 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Programme – Waterworks

David Rozenblatt: Flux
Georg Frederic Händel: ‘Hornpipe’ from Water Music HWV 348/9
Water Music HWV 350/17
Water Music HWV 350/16

Charles Coleman: Drenched

Philip Glass: Aguas da Amazonia

Tickets

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Date: 14 November 2018
Time: 8.00 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan
Jasim Mohamed Abdullah

Programme – Waterworks
David Rozenblatt/George Frideric Handel/Charles Coleman: Water Music Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Sasons’
Sayyidi ya sayyed sadati
Philip Glass: Aguas da Amazonia (orchestrated by Charles Coleman)

 

Tickets

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Berlin artist Philipp Geist is the man behind the mesmerising projection art of ‘Waterworks’. With more than 21 years’ experience of creating large-scale installations, exhibitions and audio-visual projects across the world, he is no stranger to working with innovative orchestras and musicians.


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Date: 29 August 2017
Time: 8.00 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Programme – Waterworks
Georg Friedrich Handel/Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’
Philip Glass (orchestrated by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia

 


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Date: 27 August 2017
Time: 7.00 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Programme – Waterworks
Georg Friedrich Handel/Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’
Philip Glass (orchestrated by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia

 


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Date: 26 August 2017
Time: 8.00 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Programme – Waterworks
Georg Friedrich Handel/Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’
Philip Glass (orchestrated by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia

 


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Date: 25 August 2017
Time: 8.00 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Programme – Waterworks
Georg Friedrich Handel/Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’
Philip Glass (orchestrated by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia

 


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When you see the ‘Waterworks’ concert photos on our Facebook page you’ll notice that the Baltic Sea Philharmonic musicians have been sporting a strikingly unconventional look on stage. Thanks to a collaboration with Monton, one of five international brands operated by Estonian fashion retailer Baltika Group, the players of the orchestra – and Kristjan Järvi and Mikhail Simonyan too – have ditched traditional concert clothing for a more street-smart style...


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Rewind twelve days to the afternoon of 30 April. Sixty excited young musicians are about to board a coach to Bad Fredeburg/Schmallenberg, a picturesque German town with a well-appointed music centre – the perfect place for rehearsing the music of ‘Waterworks’, with its themes of water and nature.


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Date: 10 May 2017
Time: 9.00 am, 11.00 am, 1.00 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Programme – Waterworks
Georg Friedrich Handel/Daniel Schnyder/Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’
Philip Glass (orchestrated by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia

 


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Date: 9 May 2017
Time: 7.00 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Programme – Waterworks
Georg Friedrich Handel/Daniel Schnyder/Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’
Philip Glass (orchestrated by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia

 


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School Concerts

Date: 8 May 2017
Time: 9.00 am, 11.00 am, 1.00 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Programme – Waterworks
Georg Friedrich Handel/Daniel Schnyder/Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’
Philip Glass (orchestrated by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia

 


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Date: 7 May 2017
Time: 3.00 pm

Baltic Sea Philharmonic
Kristjan Järvi
Mikhail Simonyan

Programme – Waterworks
Georg Friedrich Handel/Daniel Schnyder/Charles Coleman: Water Music
Philip Glass: Violin Concerto No. 2 ‘The American Four Seasons’
Philip Glass (orchestrated by Charles Coleman): Aguas da Amazonia

 


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From its earliest days, the Baltic Sea Philharmonic has always been uniting people. Every year our musicians come together from the ten countries of the Baltic Sea region, an area that was historically divided. And as an ambassador for Nordic culture, we reach out to other nations and people around the world with our music. Beyond music and culture, what unites us in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic is our connection to nature and to the landscapes of our region, and nothing shapes our natural environment more than the Baltic Sea itself. With ‘Waterworks’ we celebrate not just the life-giving essence of water, but also the Baltic Sea – that great body of water which sustains our region and joins us to all the other water in the world.

The music of ‘Waterworks’ is inspired by water and its power to bind us together, as Kristjan Järvi explains: ‘Our programme starts with Handel’s Water Music, because as Handel was born in Germany he was originally part of our Baltic compositional fabric, and it brings us all the way down to the waters of the Amazon, with Philip Glass’s Aguas da Amazonia. The music represents how we are from this region, but are also connected to the whole world. It doesn’t matter whether it’s the waters of the Baltic or the Amazon: everything is connected.’

As we mark Philip Glass’s 80th birthday year, alongside Aguas da Amazonia we perform another of his nature-themed compositions, the Violin Concerto No. 2 The American Four Seasons, for which we are delighted to welcome back the dynamic Russian-born violinist Mikhail Simonyan. We also welcome musicians of the New York-based Absolute Ensemble, who will be embedded in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic on this tour. A brilliant technical team have joined us to create a truly immersive concert experience, fusing music, fashion, sound, light and images to magical effect. This show marks a new stage in our journey as an orchestra, and we are thrilled to be sharing it for the first time with you.


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Mikhail Simonyan’s career has taken some exciting turns since 2011, when he last toured with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic, or the Baltic Sea Youth Philharmonic as it was then. As well as performing concertos with leading orchestras around the world, he has created and led a youth orchestra in Russia, and become president of a new international cultural and educational foundation. For an artist still in his early thirties, such entrepreneurial credentials say a lot about his character and charisma. ‘Some musicians are happy just playing in an orchestra, or travelling the globe as soloists,’ he says, ‘but if you want to create your own team, and build an army of great people around you, you just have to go ahead and do it.’

Mikhail shares a natural talent for leadership with Kristjan Järvi, one of his closest friends and collaborators. The two have worked together often since meeting in 1999, notably partnering for the violinist’s 2011 Deutsche Grammophon recording of the Khachaturian and Barber concertos. ‘Kristjan is like no other conductor,’ says Mikhail. ‘There is a freedom about his way of making music that I love. The whole process of rehearsing and performing is so alive with him.’

Violinist Mikhail Simonyan combines life as an international soloist with a talent for spearheading cultural and social projects

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The violinist finds a special freedom too in Glass’s Violin Concerto No.2. The music’s repetition of themes and phrases offers huge opportunities to create a singular interpretation, he says, but that same freedom makes the piece challenging: ‘In a way it makes your soul quite naked, because people can judge what kind of person you are by how you shape the music and play the phrases.’

As he reunites with Kristjan Järvi and the Baltic Sea Philharmonic, Mikhail is acutely conscious that the orchestra’s message of unity and international cooperation remains a vital one: ‘Political bridges have been burned across the Baltic region, but we will always be neighbours. The cultural bond between our countries can never be broken, and the Baltic Sea Philharmonic is making that bond stronger.’ The healing power of music is something Mikhail has seen first-hand, when he set up a project to support the Afghanistan National Institute of Music in battle-scarred Kabul. He would like to see more young musicians taking up social, educational and charitable initiatives. ‘These kinds of projects are far more important than signing a record deal or working for a big agency,’ he says. ‘You’re investing your talent, time and passion to reach a much broader range of society, an audience that will never judge you for what you’re doing, but will love you for doing it.’


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‘I want to create transformational environments,’ says Kristjan Järvi. This mission is not confined to the concert hall and the way technology and visual art can transform the audience experience. It also extends to his vision of how an orchestra can enrich the lives of its players and embolden them to change the world around them. Kristjan’s ambition to make this a reality with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic has never wavered in nearly ten years as Music Director, yet the entrepreneurial drive and leadership needed to make it happen have been with him far longer.

In 1993, as a 21-year-old graduate of the Manhattan School of Music, Järvi founded the Absolute Ensemble, a band that brings together jazz, hip-hop, electro-acoustic, classical and other musical styles. This boundary-busting group, three members of which are joining the Baltic Sea Philharmonic on its ‘Waterworks’ tour, has created its own distinctive sound. And the band’s evolution has been driven not only by Kristjan’s omnivorous musical tastes, but also by his encouragement of the group’s members to improvise, arrange and compose.

Kristjan Järvi thrives on reshaping the orchestral experience for performers and audiences alike

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The collective energy of the Absolute Ensemble carries through to the Baltic Sea Philharmonic, where Kristjan sees himself as part of the orchestra, and not an archetypal leader. ‘I don’t want to lead from outside and say “Follow me,”’ he says. ‘I’m someone who makes music with them, and it just happens to be my job to stand in front of them.’ Though there is no denying his dynamism as a conductor; the New York Times hailed him as ‘a kinetic force on the podium, like Leonard Bernstein reborn’.

For Kristjan, however, everybody in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic has an equal presence and importance. Instilling a feeling of true equality is liberating for the players, he says, and encourages an entrepreneurial spirit, the feeling that anything is possible. ‘I’m not preaching to them, but gently raising their consciousness. They are the ones taking the change to another level,’ he says. ‘The brilliance of music is that it’s not like religion or politics, where you have to tell people what to believe and what to do. Whether as performers or members of the audience, music is something that flips a switch in all of us.’


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As on previous visits to Denmark, the Baltic Sea Philharmonic will give a series of school concerts during the ‘Waterworks’ tour as part of Danish Radio’s ‘Into the Music’ project.


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