Dita-Immermane_Newsletter-1200x800.jpg

<div class="at-above-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/inside-the-virtual-orchestra/"></div>Steve Reich’s ‘Music for Ensemble and Orchestra’ (2018) will have its German premiere at the Usedom Music Festival on 21 September 2019, as part of the Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s ‘Divine Geometry’ tour.<!-- AddThis Advanced Settings above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/inside-the-virtual-orchestra/"></div><!-- AddThis Share Buttons generic via filter on get_the_excerpt -->


Steve-Reich_rectangle.jpg

<div class="at-above-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/interview-divine-geometry-steve-reich/"></div>Steve Reich’s ‘Music for Ensemble and Orchestra’ (2018) will have its German premiere at the Usedom Music Festival on 21 September 2019, as part of the Baltic Sea Philharmonic’s ‘Divine Geometry’ tour.<!-- AddThis Advanced Settings above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/interview-divine-geometry-steve-reich/"></div><!-- AddThis Share Buttons generic via filter on get_the_excerpt -->


SDinnerstein-credit-Lisa-Marie-Mazzucco-14_rectangle-1200x1585.jpg

<div class="at-above-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/interview-divine-geometry-simone-dinnerstein/"></div>American pianist Simone Dinnerstein will perform Philip Glass’s Piano Concerto No. 3 (2017) with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic and Kristjan Järvi on the ‘Divine Geometry’ tour of Italy and Germany in September 2019.<!-- AddThis Advanced Settings above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/interview-divine-geometry-simone-dinnerstein/"></div><!-- AddThis Share Buttons generic via filter on get_the_excerpt -->


Nils-Biesewig-1200x1798.jpg

https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/wp-content/uploads/Nils-Biesewig.jpg

We quizzed the players of Baltic Sea Philharmonic about their musical life and their experience with the ensemble. Let’s meet one of them, 28-year-old violist Nils Biesewig from Germany, right now:


Nils, what do you like most about playing in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

I love the way of music making. There is so much energy and groove, so much mutual will. It is a very intense experience.

Which musicians have inspired you the most?

I admire Claudio Abbado because of his huge musicality and his elegant way of conducting. The  Finnish violinist  Pekka Kuusisto inspires me because of his unique style and spontaneity. I hope we work with him soon!

What’s been the best moment of your Baltic Sea Philharmonic experience so far?

In 2016 we played the Viljandi Suite as an encore. It was a thrilling experience. Kristjan persuaded the audience to start dancing and we left the stage still playing. It ended up in a big party.

If you weren’t going to be a musician, what would you have done instead?

I also studied Music Education and German to become a teacher at secondary schools, and I regularly work in that area.

Apart from family and friends, what do miss most about home when you’re on tour?

Actually, when I am on the road I am usually very happy, and I don’t want to go back home too soon. I love to see and experience new things.


Alberto-Rodriguez-Rodriguez.jpg

We quizzed the players of Baltic Sea Philharmonic about their musical life and their experience with the ensemble. Let’s meet one of them, 21-year-old percussionist Alberto Rodriguez from Spain/ Norway, right now:


https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/wp-content/uploads/Alberto-Rodriguez-Rodriguez.jpg

How many years have you played in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

This is my first year with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic.

What do you like most about playing in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

The great atmosphere and the people I play with

How old were you when started learning your instrument?

I was eight when I started to learn percussion.

Which musicians have inspired you the most?

My teachers and friends. They were my source of inspiration and motivation.

Which orchestral work would you most like to play with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

I would love to play Ein Heldenleben by Richard Strauss.

What’s been the best moment of your Baltic Sea Philharmonic experience so far?

My very first concert with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic in Hattingen, Germany. It was just fantastic!

What’s your favourite piece of music by a composer from your home country?

Chants d’Espagne by Albéniz

If you weren’t going to be a musician what would you have done instead?

Probably I would have done something very different. Maybe I would have studied to be an engineer.

Apart from family and friends, what do miss most about home when you’re away?

I miss the food from Spain. But I also miss the smell of the rain in my hometown – there’s something very special about it.


Mari-Liis-Urb.jpg

We quizzed the players of Baltic Sea Philharmonic about their musical life and their experience with the ensemble. Let’s meet one of them, 23-year-old violinist Mari-Liis Urb from Estonia, right now:


https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/wp-content/uploads/Mari-Liis-Urb.jpg

How many years have you played in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

‘Waterworks’ was my first tour with the orchestra.

What do you like most about playing in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

I like that everyone is enjoying what they’re doing. It’s wonderful to see how enthusiastic the musicians are, and how Kristjan gives energetic, sometimes even crazy impulses to make the orchestra sound not like a regular orchestra but more like a band whose members are allowed to show their individuality and musicality.

How old were you when started learning your instrument?

I was five when I was first introduced to the violin.

Which musicians have inspired you the most?

Probably the biggest inspiration for me is to see my musician friends being successful in the music world. To see them grow as musicians, study at prestigious schools and have a bright start to their career makes me look up to them. They might be the next world-famous artists, so why not support their work and talent right now and be inspired by them?

Which orchestral work would you most like to play with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

Something by Debussy, such as La mer, Nocturnes or Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune

What’s been the best moment of your Baltic Sea Philharmonic experience so far?

Having fun in the school concerts

What’s your favourite piece of music by a composer from your home country?

Estonia has so many great composers, so it’s difficult to choose. Because everyone knows Arvo Pärt and Eduard Tubin, I’ll pick someone else: Heino Eller’s Koit (Dawn) is an excellent orchestral piece, and for my instrument there is a beautiful piece called The Poem of Love by Artur Lemba. The tradition of Estonian choir singing is very important for me, and the composer Cyrillus Kreek wrote some amazingly beautiful songs such as The Psalms of David Nos. 104 and 141.

If you weren’t going to be a musician, what would you have done instead?

Whatever I did instead of music, I would still be into music a lot. Maybe I would have had my own little custom-made lingerie boutique, or I would be working with abandoned dogs.

Apart from family and friends, what do miss most about home when you’re away?

Besides the important people at home, nothing really


Augusta-Jusionyte.jpg

We quizzed the players of Baltic Sea Philharmonic about their musical life and their experience with the ensemble. Let’s meet one of them, 30-year-old violinist Augusta Jusionytė from Lithuania, right now:


https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/wp-content/uploads/Augusta-Jusionyte.jpg

How many years have you played in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

I have played in the orchestra in 2010, 2011 and 2017.

What do you like most about playing in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

I love the amazing atmosphere and energy that we all create in the concerts. The way Kristjan is working with the orchestra inspires all of us, and his choice of repertoire is relevant and totally exciting.

How old were you when started learning your instrument?

I was six years old.

Who are your musical heroes or heroines?

My heroes are Maxim Vengerov, Daniil Trifonov, Justin Bieber and Michael Jackson. My heroines are Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Cecilia Bartoli and Laurie Anderson.

Which orchestral work would you most like to play with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

The Poem of Ecstasy by Scriabin

What’s been the best moment of your Baltic Sea Philharmonic experience so far?

Rehearsals with Kristjan, when the orchestra was learning to memorise Stravinsky’s The Firebird. It was such an adventurous, challenging and inspiring atmosphere. I think the Baltic Sea Philharmonic rehearsals are very creative.

What’s your favourite piece of music by a composer from your home country?

Every piece by Gediminas Gelgotas

If you weren’t going to be a musician what would you have done instead?

Something to do with music

Apart from family and friends, what do miss most about home when you’re away?

Apart from my family and friends I don’t miss anything. I have everything with me.


Dusan-Kostic-1200x1798.jpg

https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/wp-content/uploads/Dusan-Kostic.jpg

We quizzed the players of Baltic Sea Philharmonic about their musical life and their experience with the ensemble. Let’s meet one of them, 21-year-old double bassist Dušan Kostić from Serbia, right now:


How many years have you played in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

One year

 

What do you like most about playing in the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

Playing with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic is an amazing experience for me! The energy of the orchestra and Kristjan Järvi is so incredible that it makes you want to give more and more at every rehearsal and concert.

 

How old were you when started learning your instrument?

13

 

Which musicians have inspired you the most?

Claudio Abbado, Gustavo Dudamel, Kristjan Järvi and Roman Simovic

 

Which orchestral work would you most like to play with the Baltic Sea Philharmonic?

Strauss’s Ein Heldenleben and also Tchaikovsky’s Sixth Symphony

 

What’s been the best moment of your Baltic Sea Philharmonic experience so far?

The ‘Waterworks’ encores at the concert in Copenhagen

 

What’s your favourite piece of music by a composer from your home country?

Zoran Erić’s Cartoon

 

If you weren’t going to be a musician what would you have done instead?

I would play basketball.

 

Apart from family and friends, what do miss most about home when you’re away?

I miss my bed and sleep.


Logo_BalticSeaPhilharmonic_rgb.jpg

<div class="at-above-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/anniversary-reflections/"></div>We asked Kristjan Järvi, Thomas Hummel and Dr Dirk von Ameln to look back at the first ten years of the Baltic Sea Philharmonic and share their memories and highlights, as well as their aspirations for the future. Kristjan is the orchestra’s Founding Conductor and Music Director. Thomas is the orchestra’s Executive Director and also Artistic Director of the Usedom Music Festival. Dirk is Chairman of the Board of the Baltic Sea Music Education Foundation.<!-- AddThis Advanced Settings above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/anniversary-reflections/"></div><!-- AddThis Share Buttons generic via filter on get_the_excerpt -->


160920_BMEF_Alexey_Miranda-2-1.jpg

<div class="at-above-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/musicians-talk/"></div>Alexey Mikhaylenko, a clarinettist from Russia who joined Baltic Sea Youth Philharmonic in 2011 and Miranda Erlich, a double bass player from Germany, who joined Baltic Sea Philharmonic this year, share their thoughts on what the experience means to them<!-- AddThis Advanced Settings above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post-cat-page addthis_tool" data-url="https://blog.baltic-sea-philharmonic.eu/musicians-talk/"></div><!-- AddThis Share Buttons generic via filter on get_the_excerpt -->


By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close